FUN MAIL: Picture Book Proofs!

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Look what arrived on my porch yesterday afternoon! A package from Sterling containing the proofs for DIVA DELORES AND THE OPERA HOUSE MOUSE!  I’d seen the illustrations in little images on my computer screen, but seeing them full size and on paper makes my heart sing!

My daughter and I spent a nice long while exploring each and every page and enjoying all the little details that I hadn’t noticed before, such as Rebecca’s wonderful use of scratchy strokes to capture the old opera house floors and Delores’ extremely expressive whiskers.

Next stop, (I think), the printer!  Thank you, Sterling, and thank you, Rebecca Gerlings, for making this project a reality. I can’t wait for this Diva and her charming Opera House Mouse to make their debuts.  (Only 5 month and two weeks from now, but who’s counting? =) )

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COVER REVEAL: Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse (Sterling, Spring 2018)

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Today I’m delighted to share with you the cover for my next book, DIVA DELORES AND THE OPERA HOUSE MOUSE (Sterling Children’s Books, Spring 2018), which is scheduled to hit bookstores everywhere this coming March.  Illustrator Rebecca Gerlings has a gift for whimsy and I LOVE her depiction of Delores and Fernando, the mouse.  I’ve seen the inside too and each and every illustration makes me want to sing!  (But, don’t worry, I’ll refrain from letting loose my vibratto.) Instead, I’ll just say, “Thank you, Sterling Children’s Books, for pairing us together and thank you, Rebecca, for bringing this story to delightful life with your illustrations.”

This book is now available for pre-order at several online retailers, should you happen to want to reserve a copy.

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: A Chat with Andria Warmflash Rosenbaum in Celebration of the September release of BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER… and a GIVEAWAY!

 

Picture book author Andria Warmflash Rosenbaum’s newest book, BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER releases two weeks from now and I’m so excited that she’s here today to give us a little preview interview. Published by Scholastic Press and illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham,  BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER is a story of sister rivalry/affection with a clever monsterly twist.  Kirkus Reviews hails it as  “Monstrous sisterly fun”. Thank you for joining us today, Andria. It’s always fun to get to meet the author! Well, let’s get started with my questions in pink and Andria’s in black to complement the book cover.

What is the inspiration behind BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER?

Truth be told, this book is based on something that happened to me when I was a child. I actually lost my sister–on purpose when I was about five and she was three. The world was a very different place back then and parents gave their children a lot more freedom. Luckily, my little sister was found by two older girls and safely brought home. But as I grew older I was tormented with guilt over what could have happened. This book is a love letter to my sister and the unbreakable bonds of sisterhood.

Your sister must be so touched. And as a sister myself, I love that this book celebrates sisterhood!

And here you are with your sister! LOVE this retro pic! IMG_6886What would you like readers to take away from this story?

 Sisterhood is a multifaceted relationship deeply rooted in love. The kind of love that inspires courage, strength and fearlessness. I hope children will find their own inner strength when they read BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER. 

 In addition, I think Edwin Fotheringham made a huge effort to take the “scary” out of the monsters in the book. Instead they’re cute, colorful and funny which allows young children to imagine engaging with the monsters without fear. 

Well, if the cover is any indication, your text and his illustrations are a winning combination.

BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER is not your first book. Tell us a little bit about your journey as an author.

 My writing journey has been long and challenging. I’m lucky in the fact that I knew I wanted to write children’s books since I was very young. But I wasn’t a good reader and that hampered my writing skills. I did give up trying to get published many times, but I always came back to writing because I love it. Thankfully, persistence is probably my strongest quality. 

When my children were little, I focused on writing poems and short stories for magazines like Cricket and Highlights. My first book sale (A GRANDMA LIKE YOURS/A GRANDPA LIKE YOURS, Kar-Ben Publishing, Lerner Publishing Group 2006) didn’t come until after I was 40. Around the same time, I sold an emergent reader written in poems called TWO SWEET PEAS to Bebop Books, Lee & Low Books, Inc. 2006. It was almost 10 years before I sold another book.

Yes, persistence is a crucial quality for a writer.  Children’s periodicals are a great venue for children’s writers. Now I want to take a peek at  your work there too!

Teachers and parents are always looking for ways to tie picture books into the curriculum or extend the enjoyment with post-reading activities. Do you have any extension activities your readers might enjoy?

I’m a big fan of teacher’s guides and I’m in the process of creating one for BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER. But until it’s done, I’d suggest teachers focus on the common core goals of Speaking & Listening. Specifically, the Who, What, When, Where, How and Whys of the story. Then they can give their classes a chance to draw pictures of what their Inner Monsters might look like.

 Also, in an earlier version of the manuscript, I had Lucy make a ticket for Mia to Monstralia. Teachers might ask students: What would you call a world populated by monsters? Students can take this challenge a step further by creating maps of their monster worlds.

These are great ideas, Andria!

Finally, what’s the one question that you wished I’d asked but didn’t.

Well, since you asked ;-), I wish you would have asked if I have any other books coming out?

Why yes I do! In the fall of 2018, Sterling Children’s Books will publish my next book called BOATS WILL FLOAT. It’s a rhyming picture book about what many different boats do, illustrated by Jordi Solano. Originally, it was intended as a follow-up to my picture book called TRAINS DON’T SLEEP, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017. But I have a feeling Jordi will be adding his own story through his beautiful illustrations.

 Thanks so much for inviting me to share my books with your readers, Laura! They can follow me on Twitter @andriawrose and find more information about my books on my website: www.andriawarmflashrosenbaum.com

Thanks so much for joining me today, Andria!  And congratulations on this newest release.  =)

Andria W. RosenbaumAUTHOR BIO: Andria Warmflash Rosenbaum dreamed about writing picture books for children of all ages since she was eleven years old. She has a Master’s degree in Special Education from Bank Street College and writes from her home in New Jersey. Her poetry and short stories have been published in Babybug, Children’s Playmate, Cricket, Ladybug, Highlight, Spider and Turtle. Her short story, “The Color of Hope” won the 2008 SCBWI Magazine Merit Award for fiction. She is the author of multiple picture books including A GRANDMA LIKE YOURS/ A GRANDPA LIKE YOURS (Kar-Ben Publishing, Inc., Lerner Publications), TRAINS DON’T SLEEP (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER (Scholastic Press) with several more in the works. 

Don’t forget to enter  the GIVEAWAY!!!!! 

Andrea has generously offered to send a free copy of BIG SISTER, LITTLE MONSTER (Scholastic, September 2017), written by Andria Warmflash Rosenbaum and illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham, to one lucky winner. If you’d like to enter, simply leave a comment below. (NOTE: Must be U.S. resident and at least 18 years old to enter.) The giveaway ends Tuesday, September 12, 2017 (the day the book releases!), at 12:01 am EST. 

 

WHEN YOUR ELEPHANT HAS THE SNIFFLES: Eight Extension Activities for LITTLE ONES

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This week I’m delighted to be a part of Susanna Leonard Hill’s multi-picture book blog tour with eight extension activities to celebrate this month’s release of Susanna’s ADORABLE new board book WHEN YOUR ELEPHANT HAS THE SNIFFLES, illustrated by Daniel Wiseman and published by Little Simon. My kids would have loved this story at bedtime – simple, sweet… and FUNNY! And I love the board book format – just the right size for little hands! Now, without further ado, treat yourself the book trailer created by Susanna!  (She is so multi-talented!). Then help yourself to a rich serving of book themed extension activities perfect for 2 – 4 year olds.

EIGHT Extension Activites for WHEN YOUR ELEPHANT HAS THE SNIFFLES

IMG_50631. Pretend YOUR stuffie has the sniffles.  Little ones love extending a story through play.  So, have them grab their favorite stuffy, or stuffies, and pretend they have the sniffles. What antics will they go through to keep their sniffly stuffies from sneezing!

 2. Create your own shadow puppets.  One of the fun ways the child in the story entertains her elephant is by showing him how to make shadow puppets.  After reading the story, you, too, can create shadow puppets.  All you need is a flashlight, your arms and hands, and a blank wall. Don’t forget to dim the light so you get good shadows. 

3. Cover your sneeze, please!  Use this fun, playful story as an opportunity to teach your little one about how sneezes spread germs. Then, together, pretend you are elephants.  Using one arm as your trunk, pretend to have a great big sneeze, but instead of spreading that sneeze around, catch it in the crook of your trunk (arm).

4. Make a SNIFFLE list. After giggling over all the ways the little girl cares for her elephant when he has the sniffles, have your child list – using words or pictures – all the things he/she likes to do on quiet, stay-at-home sniffly days.

Version 35. Decorate elephant cookies.  I found an elephant cookie cutter at my local kitchen shop, but making your own template out of tagboard would be easy enough. Then mix up your favorite sugar cookie and icing recipes and decorate some elephants. The question is, do your cookie creatures have the sniffles?

6. Make and send a “Get Well” Sniffle Card. Does your child know anyone who has the sniffles or who is sick?  Extend the story experience and foster kindness by taking out the markers and creating a get-well card for that special someone. 

7. Make elephant crafts.  The internet is full of elephant-themed craft ideas. Here’s a great post from the lifestyle and parenting blog Living Off Love and Coffee to get you started: 25 Cute and Easy Elephant Crafts for Kids.

8. Let your child “reread” the story using picture clues. Reading the pictures is a great pre-reading skill because it encourages interacting with the page. With that in mind, let your child “read” the story to you, using the pictures to tell the story.

To learn more about Susanna Leonard Hill, visit her website.  

Finally, a little reminder from Susanna: Don’t forget to share this post using #whenyourbooks!  Every time you post with #whenyourbooks you get an entry in her end-of-tour raffle for a Special Prize!

HAPPY READING ALL!

 

 

GOOD NEWS: Picture Book Deal!

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I’ve been keeping this to myself for some time now, but the announcement ran in Publishers Weekly today, so I think I can finally let loose my vibrato!

Per their announcement, DIVA DELORES AND THE OPERA HOUSE MOUSE is “an ode to artistic collaboration, starring an opera-loving mouse who wants to help and the diva who thinks she deserves bigger help than a mouse.” It’s scheduled for publication by Sterling Children’s Books in Spring 2018 and is illustrated by British illustrator Rebecca Gerlings. I’ve already seen sketches and several spreads and I am over the moon with delight!  I can’t wait for this book to release!

For the official announcement, press here.

Those of you who have enjoyed participating in Tara Lazar’s STORYSTORM, formerly known as PICTURE BOOK IDEA MONTH, might be encouraged know that this was the very first idea on my 2011 PiBoIdMo list! It took several years and many, many revisions until it was finally ready to submit, but persistence (and patience) paid off!

Happy Thursday all!

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: A Chat with Gretchen Brandenburg McLellan in Celebration of the Release of her Debut Picture Book MRS. MCBEE LEAVES ROOM 3!

Today I am honored to have debut picture book author Gretchen Brandenburg McClellan as my guest in celebration of the recent release of Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3, illustrated by Grace Zong and published by Peachtree Publishers.  It’s the story of a class saying goodbye to their beloved teacher – a perfect book for this time of year!  Thank you so much for joining us, Gretchen. Let’s get started – with my questions in blue to match your delightful cover.

Question #1: What inspired you to write Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3? 

For many students, school is their ground. Their sense of security is rooted in the geography of the school–knowing that Ms. A’s room is there and Mr. B’s room is across the hall. (Many very young students believe teachers live at school!) I’ve had students who were heading off to middle-school ask me through tears if I would still be in my room the next year. They needed to know that this part of their lives was stable as the tectonic plates of their lives shifted.

This connection to the geography of the school inspired me to write Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3. Originally, Mrs. McBee was leaving to move to a new school, but my editor and I decided to expand the possible reasons why Mrs. McBee might be leaving by not being specific. Teachers leave for so many reasons: to have babies, to return to the university, to move to a new school or away from the area, to change careers, to care for themselves or family members who are ill, or finally to retire. All of these moves are bittersweet.

Around the time I was writing this book, a dear friend and former co-worker was dying of breast cancer. She had to say good-bye to her own elementary classroom and her students to her. I was able to share the sale of Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3 with her and my decision to dedicate my book to her. It brought us both a bittersweet joy, knowing she wouldn’t live to see the art or the book in print. A memorial library has been established in her honor at Hathaway Elementary in Washougal, Washington where we taught together. I look forward to adding Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3 to her shelves. I am sure she would love it!

I always love hearing the stories behind a book’s dedication. How very special that you decided the book to your dear teacher friend. I’m sure that means a lot to her family.

Question #2: Did you always want to be a writer? Tell us a little bit about your writing journey?

My journey writing for children started with motherhood. I was passionate about reading and passionate about the kinds of toys I provided my kids. I was just as passionate about the toys I didn’t want them to have. At that time, I was involved in an advocacy group in my area that promoted creative play called SNAP—Support Non-Aggressive Play. I read a picture book by Charlotte Zolotow called William’s Dollabout a boy who wanted a doll, much to the disapproval of his father. I couldn’t find a picture book that addressed the concerns that so many of us in SNAP had about violent toys. So I decided to write one. My manuscript, Joseph and His Toys,f eatured a boy who was not allowed to have violent toys and the creative ways he found to feel a sense of power and control over “bad guys” and find a sense of justice. At a local book fair, I met children’s author Erik Kimmel and asked him how to submit my book for publication. He told me to join SCBWI, get the manuscript in the mail, and focus on writing my next story. At that time I didn’t intend for there to be a next story. But I was a goner. I fell in love with picture books and writing picture books and both have been my passion ever since.

Question #3: Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3 is your debut picture book.  How does it feel to be “post-publication”? What do you like best about this exciting new stage?  

The joys and challenges of being a debut writer are still unfolding, and I expect more surprises along the way as I go through my debut year. The best part of this new stage is sharing my book with children in schools and bookstores. In schools I ask teachers to select a student who needs a little sparkle in his/her life to pass on a little magic wand to, and when I start my presentations I say, “Somebody must have a magic wand out there, because my dream is coming true right now.” The child is delighted to hold up the wand and I am just as delighted to explain how the dream of being an author isn’t complete without having kids to share books with.

I am also having a blast writing and improving my presentations and activities that go along with the book. At first I felt like I was working on a Masters in Anticipatory Anxiety and was really apprehensive about the public/performing life of being an author. But I’ve switched programs and now am heading straight to my PhD in excitement and joy. I love being an author and presenter!

Ha! Love that Masters in Anticipatory Anxiety and I think your magic wand set up is absolutely brilliant. And I’m so happy to hear that you’ve almost earned that delightful Phd!  =)

Question #4: As a former reading specialist, what three tips would you give parents for keeping the love of reading alive over summer? 

 Three tips for keeping the love of reading alive over the summer are 1) join the summer reading program at the public library, 2) have books available everywhere for kids to read, including the car, bathroom and tent and 3) share books together regularly. I firmly believe that children should be read aloud to through grade school for a multitude of reasons, including their development as readers, because reading comprehension doesn’t catch up with listening comprehension until about sixth grade. Reading aloud has so many positive effects on family relationships too. And it is so much fun! The health of the audio book industry attests to the pleasure of hearing a story read aloud. Who hasn’t wanted to keep on driving to finish a chapter or remain sitting in the driveway to listen to just one more?

These are wonderful suggestions. My daughter’s in sixth grade and we still love reading aloud to each other!  

Question #5: What’s next? Are there more picture books in the pipeline?  

I am very excited about three picture books releasing in 2018. I’m Done!, illustrated by Catherine Odell, is about an impulsive and playful little beaver who finally learns what it means to be done (Holiday House, Spring 2018).  When Your Daddy’s a Soldier, illustrated by E.B. Lewis, is the story of a brother and sister whose father goes off to war (Beach Lane, Fall 2018).  Button and Bundle, illustrated by Gillian Flint, tells the story of first friends whose world is disrupted when one moves away, but who find a way to preserve their special world of play even though they are miles apart (Knopf, Fall 2018).

Thank you so much for joining us, Gretchen.  It’s always fun to share in the joy of a debut book release!

IMG_8515e edit-1 (2)BIO: Gretchen Brandenburg McLellan is a former elementary reading specialist who now devotes herself to writing for children and visiting schools as an author. She just celebrated the release of Mrs. McBee Leaves Room 3, illustrated by Grace Zong (Peachtree) and looks forward to the release of three more picture books 2018. She is an active tribe-member of SCBWI and writes chapter books and middle-grade fiction as well.  

Gretchen grew up as a global nomad, daughter of a career Army officer, and lived on three continents.  She has settled in Camas, WA where she lives with her husband, cat and dog, stunt squirrels, nomadic neighborhood chickens, and celebrates when her children and grandchildren come home. Children will find a home in her heartfelt books about community, courage and compassion.

When she isn’t writing or teaching, Gretchen can be found playing word games, hiking in the woods, x-country skiing and attending plays.  Please visit Gretchen at gretchenmclellan.com for more information about her books, events and author visits. 

HAPPY BLOG ANNIVERSARY: Cupcake and Sugar Pea

Since this blog just celebrated its fifth year anniversary,  I thought I’d celebrate by re-posting one my favorite entries from year one.  That seven year old is now twelve!  And like her, I still like to keep several horses in my writerly stable. How about you? Enjoy!

After school, instead of walking home, my seven-year-old has taken to riding — horseback riding, that is. She alternates between two imaginary horses — Cupcake and Sugar Pea. Her horses trot and canter. They gallop and run like the wind.

Actually, that’s not quite true. Cupcake runs like the wind. Sugar Pea is a little slower. She prefers to stop and smell the clover. Cupcake, by contrast, loves jumping over imaginary fences, the wind whipping at her mane. Their styles are so different, I never have to ask my daughter which horse she’s chosen. I just say, “Wow, Cupcake’s fast!” or “What does Sugar Pea think of the lilacs?”

I’m a lot like my daughter. I write best when I have at least two projects going at once. For example, right now I’m working on two very different picture books, several poems and a handful of blog posts. And, just as my daughter alternates ponies, based on mood, I alternate projects, based on interest, deadlines, or variety. Not only does this keep my writing fresh, it allows the pieces I’m not working on to rest, so that I can return to them with new eyes.

Keeping several horses in the stable, keeps me energized and happy as a writer. It also reduces writer’s block because I always have something in process. If one piece isn’t working, I simply take out another horse for the day. What about you? Are you a one-horse writer or do you prefer to keep several horses in your stable?

KidLitTV Celebrates READING with a Special Read Aloud Event!

This past Friday, as part of National Reading Awareness Month, KidLitTV hosted a Read Aloud Live Stream to raise reading awareness and celebrate picture books. The festivities took place at the KidLitTV studio in New York City. For over three hours, energetically emceed by the delightful Katya Szewczuk, dozens of children’s authors, illustrators, librarians, and other book lovers, read picture books aloud. There was even a picture book themed poem in the mix and some singing.

I think all there agreed that it was wonderful spending the afternoon with  KidLit TV   sharing in their wonderful mission “to create fun new ways to reinforce an appreciation of reading that children will carry with them for the rest of their lives”.

Since the event was live and not recorded, you can’t watch it now, but I hope this small collection of snapshots captures the  excitement and magic of the event and, most especially, the magic of reading out loud!  There were, of course, many, many amazing authors present.  Below is just a sampling of the people I happened to take pictures of. (In hindsight, I wish I’d been a better camera girl so I had even more pictures to share.)

While waiting to read, I was delighted to meet author Elizabeth Upton.  We quickly discovered a shared passion for poetry and rhyme.  Here she is reading her darling rhyming debut, Maxi the Little Taxi, illustrated by the amazing Henry Cole and published by Scholastic.

I also had the pleasure of meeting best-selling Zonderkidz author Sally Lloyd-Jones who delighted the audience with her reading of Baby Wren and the Great Gift, illustrated by Jen Corace and published by Zonderkidz.

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Fellow New Jersey author Laurie Hallmark read her fascinating Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine illustrated by April Chu and published by Creston Books.  Laurie’s was one of several non-fiction picture books read and I loved each one. They were a good reminder to me about  just how diverse the picture book format can be – with books to please just about any age and interest.

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The adorably funny (and fully-costumed) Robin Newman no-doubt captivated our virtual audience just as much as she did those of us in the studio with her animated reading of Hildie Bitterpickles Needs her Sleep, illustrated by Chris Ewald and published by Creston Books.

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Instead of reading a picture book, author Carol Weston gave us a most charmingly moving reading of her poem “Picture Books”.  Afterward, I had the pleasure of chatting with her and was excited to learn that her newest book, Speed of Life, a novel geared to 11 – 14 year olds, and set to release April 4th, has already received three starred reviews! It’s on my list of books to read with Miss A.!

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I also especially loved hearing my wonderful critique partner, Rosanne L. Kurstedt, read her heartwarming mother/child picture book, And I Thought about You.  She has such a moving way with words.

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Finally, oops, I almost forgot, I got to read too!

It was a wonderful afternoon. Thank you for having us, KidLit TV!

About KidLit TV. Founded by Julie Gribble,  KidLit TV, is a fabulous resource for kid lit fans of all ages. Comprised of a diverse group of parents, educators, librarians, kid lit creators, and award winning filmmakers, KidLit TV works creatively to bring great books to kids. Their self-described mission is to create fun new ways to reinforce an appreciation of reading that children will carry with them for the rest of their lives. They are doing a great job and have even been awarded the Parents’ Choice Gold Award! What a wonderful contribution they are making to the world of children’s literature!

GOOD NEWS: New Picture Book Deal!

IMG_3148I’ve been keeping this news to myself for some time now, but the announcement ran in Publishers Marketplace today, and I even spotted the book listed on the Target website, so I think I can finally spill the beans!

Here it is:

“Laura Sassi’s LOVE IS KIND, in which a little owl searches for the perfect gift for his beloved grandmother and learns about love along the way, illustrated by Rosalinde Bonnet, to Barbara Herndon at Zonderkidz, for publication in December 2018, by Lara Perkins at Andrea Brown Literary Agency for the author (World).”

And now, in celebration, have a virtual nibble from one of these adorable cookies baked by Miss A. (She sure knows how to decorate a cookie!)

Here’s my writerly takeaway from this latest fun news: Keep writing.  Keep subbing. Keep honing your craft. Be true to yourself and good things will come. Happy writing all!

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: A Chat with Annie Silvestro in Celebration of the Release of her Debut Picture Book BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB!

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Today I’m delighted to have children’s author, Annie Silvestro, as my guest. Annie and I met several years ago at the NJSCBWI annual conference and I’ve enjoyed following her (and cheering her on) in her writing journey.  Her debut picture book BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB, illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss and published by Doubleday Books for Young Readers, releases this month. The story of a book-loving bunny who sneaks into the town library and borrows books for all his forest friends, KIRKUS REVIEWS hails BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB as a “sweet salute to reading” . And in its review, PUBLISHERS’ WEEKLY states that Annie “makes the pleasures of reading abundantly clear.”  What’s abundantly clear to me is that Annie has a gift for charming storytelling. Welcome, Annie and let’s get started.

Your love of language is evident in BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB. How was that love developed?

Thank you for saying that! I have always been a reader and my love of language goes hand and hand with that. One of the many joys of reading is recognizing that perfect word, sentence, paragraph, or passage that stands out and elevates the story.

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Author Annie Silvestro as a child.

Did you always want to be a writer? Tell us a little bit about your writing journey. 

I have always loved children’s literature, but it took me a while to see myself as a writer. I first attempted to write down a beloved story that my father told me growing up. I failed at that, but the experience gave me the courage to keep trying and to come up with my own ideas. Once I found the SCBWI, it was a done deal.
Do you have writing advice for children? Adults? 

For children who are writing, my best advice would be to recognize that your first draft isn’t your only draft. Writing also means lots and lots of revision.

Good advice in general is to read as much as you can. Listen and observe the world around you. Ideas are everywhere. When you are lucky enough to get one, write it down! Just as quickly as ideas can appear, they tend to disappear as well.

 BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB is your debut picture book.  How does it feel to be “post-publication”!  What do you like best about this exciting new stage?

It is the most amazing feeling! So far the absolute best part has been photos that friends and family have sent of their kids holding or reading my book. It is surreal and wonderful and I haven’t fully wrapped my head around it. I am feeling all kinds of grateful, too, for the support I’ve received. It’s unbelievable.

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A young fan enjoying Annie’s book!

Finally, what’s the one question that you wished I’d asked but didn’t.  


I wish you had asked me about Picture the Books! Picture the Books is an incredible crew of debut authors and illustrators with books coming out in 2017. It is so fun to share this journey with such a talented group! You can find us all in one place and learn about our books and more here.
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Annie Silvestro is a lover of books who reads and writes as much as possible and can often be found shuffling piles of them around so she has a place to sit or someplace to put her teacup. Her picture books include BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB, illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss (Doubleday Books for Young Readers), MICE SKATING, illustrated by Teagan White (Sterling, Fall 2017), and THE CHRISTMAS TREE WHO LOVED TRAINS, illustrated by Paola Zakimi (HarperCollins, Fall 2018). Annie lives by the beach in NJ with her husband and two boys who like to read, and a cat who does not. Visit Annie online at: www.anniesilvestro.com and on Twitter and Instagram: @anniesilvestro.